Added to the Bookshelf – 12/8/13

Posted December 8, 2013 by Melissa in Added to the Bookshelf | 23 Comments

(Inspired by Mailbox Monday, IMM, Clock Rewinders and the like)

Notes from Melissa:

Hope that all of you had a great week.  Mine was busy as usual but I’m finally back to a more regular blogging schedule.  {Make sure to check out the awesome giveaway I posted for the Fierce Reads tour!}

December is a month long party around here with Birthdays  and the Holidays.  Friday was my mother’s birthday and yesterday my niece’s…let the partying begin! LOL

Today we are putting up our decor and making merry.

Recently on Melissa’s Eclectic Bookshelf

What I Read Last Week:

  • White Trash Beautiful (White Trash Trilogy #1) – Theresa Mummert (audiobook)
  • Werewolf Sings The Blues (Midnight Magic Mystery #2) – Jennifer Harlow
  • Path Unchosen (Daughter of ravenswood #1) – Kim Cleary

What I Am Reading Today:

  • The Humans – Matt Haig (audiobook)
  • Beautiful Ruins – Jess Walters

For Review:

 

She Is Not Invisible
by Marcus Sedgwick


Synopsis:
Laureth Peak’s father has taught her to look for recurring events, patterns, and numbers–a skill at which she’s remarkably talented. Her secret: She is blind. But when her father goes missing, Laureth and her 7-year-old brother Benjamin are thrust into a mystery that takes them to New York City where surviving will take all her skill at spotting the amazing, shocking, and sometimes dangerous connections in a world full of darkness. She Is Not Invisible is an intricate puzzle of a novel that sheds a light on the delicate ties that bind people to each other.

 

Purchased:

 

Free Falling (The Irish End Game Series #1)
by Susan Kiernan-Lewis

Synopsis:
When David and Sarah Woodson take a much-needed vacation with their ten-year old son, John, their intention is to find a relaxing, remote spot to take a break from the artificial stimulation of their busy world back in Jacksonville, Florida. What happens within hours of settling in to their rural, rustic little cottage in a far-flung spot on the coast of Ireland is an international incident that leaves the family stranded and dependent on themselves for their survival. Facing starvation, as well as looters and opportunists, they learn the hard way the important things in life. Can a family skilled only in modern day suburbia and corporate workplaces learn to survive when the world is flung back a hundred years? When there is no internet, no telephones, no electricity and no cars? And when every person near them is desperate to survive at any cost?

Borrowed from Library:

 

Beautiful Ruins
by Jess Walter

Synopsis:
The story begins in 1962. On a rocky patch of the sun-drenched Italian coastline, a young innkeeper, chest-deep in daydreams, looks on over the incandescent waters of the Ligurian Sea and spies an apparition: a tall, thin woman, a vision in white, approaching him on a boat. She is an actress, he soon learns, an American starlet, and she is dying.

And the story begins again today, half a world away, when an elderly Italian man shows up on a movie studio’s back lot-searching for the mysterious woman he last saw at his hotel decades earlier.

What unfolds is a dazzling, yet deeply human, roller coaster of a novel, spanning fifty years and nearly as many lives. From the lavish set of Cleopatra to the shabby revelry of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Walter introduces us to the tangled lives of a dozen unforgettable characters: the starstruck Italian innkeeper and his long-lost love; the heroically preserved producer who once brought them together and his idealistic young assistant; the army veteran turned fledgling novelist and the rakish Richard Burton himself, whose appetites set the whole story in motion-along with the husbands and wives, lovers and dreamers, superstars and losers, who populate their world in the decades that follow.

Gloriously inventive, constantly surprising, Beautiful Ruins is a story of flawed yet fascinating people, navigating the rocky shores of their lives while clinging to their improbable dreams.

Won:

 

The Drake Equation
by Heather Walsh

Synopsis:
She’s a Democrat, he’s a Republican. She spends her days fighting global warming at an environmental non-profit, he makes his living doing PR for Bell Motors and their fleet of SUVs. But as soon as they meet, Emily Crossley and Robert Drake realize they have encountered their intellectual match. You’re never challenged, he tells her. You’ve surrounded yourself in a cocoon of people who think exactly the same way you do. She hurls the same accusation back at him, and the fiery debates begin. Despite both of their attempts to derail it, there is no denying that they are falling in love. But their relationship is threatened by political differences, Robert’s excessive work hours, and Emily’s fear of losing her identity as she falls deeper in love. Can their love survive? The Drake Equation is a tale of modern love and all its complexities.

 

That’s all for me this week!
What new goodies have arrived on your doorstep?
Leave me a link in the comments and I’ll come check out your post!

 

 

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